Amin Shojaei

• Amin Shojaie 1986 Tehran, Iran
• Education:2014 Master of Industrial Engineering, Industrial Management Institute, Tehran, Iran 2010 Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, Azad University, Tehran, IranSolo Exhibitions:2017 Iranshah Gallery Surfacspace, Tehran, Iran2015 O Gallery, Tehran, Iran2009 Darya Beigi Gallery, Tehran, IranGroup Exhibitions:2014 Iran Artistsʼ Forum, Tehran, Iran2013 Jorjani Gallery, Tehran, Iran2013 Jorjani Gallery, Tehran, Iran2012 Saba Gallery, Tehran, Iran
Solo exhibition at “Iranshahr Gallery(Sureface)“ 1stDecember to 18stDecember2017
EXHIBITION REVIEW
by Hamid-Reza Karami
This collection was formed based on the artistʼs reaction to an absence of sensors bonding man and nature. Sensors that would be able to instantaneously monitor nature and transform information received into parametrical statistics to establish a basis for decision making.Surfaces made from flexible structures and light material such as wood, metal screens and linen are reminiscent of birdsʼ nests, cocoons of insects and/or spider webs, forming flexible homes within the existing environmental setting. Manʼs primitive homes made from tree barks and fillers such as clay and plaster inspired me as well in designing an environmentally flexible model against modern constructions that are more resistant and rigid in adapting to nature.A network of orderly pieces of wood bound together have been wrapped around the frames, resembling a halo and acting as a medium to connect the interior with the exterior. The exterior encompasses a disjointed and hollow space while interior frames are quite smooth and polished, with narrow grooves directing one to discover the interior of the art piece.Some other pieces of art display a rougher and less orderly texture, made from natural raw material such as cotton, bio- adhesives, hay, wood and leaves; the originality in the raw material reflects natureʼs simplicity and mortality.The paintings are products of a continuous process of destruction, abrasion, battery and stuffing, resulting in their amalgamation with the physical surface beneath them in such a way that has them carved or torn in some areas.Just like physical pieces, drawings contain two main visual layers. One is the linear layer that contains the frames and the other is the encasing layer that forms the texture and wraps around the frames. The layer containing the texture is at times placed on top of the frames and at others vice versa.The structure of frames, per se, becomes so prominent at times that it bulges out of the painting in bold lines and ,occasionally ,the whole piece is covered by a thin layer of paint very much like a piece of cloth that covers a structure.
This collection was formed based on the artistʼs reaction to an absence of sensors bonding man and nature. Sensors that would be able to instantaneously monitor nature and transform information received into parametrical statistics to establish a basis for decision making.Surfaces made from flexible structures and light material such as wood, metal screens and linen are reminiscent of birdsʼ nests, cocoons of insects and/or spider webs, forming flexible homes within the existing environmental setting. Manʼs primitive homes made from tree barks and fillers such as clay and plaster inspired me as well in designing an environmentally flexible model against modern constructions that are more resistant and rigid in adapting to nature.A network of orderly pieces of wood bound together have been wrapped around the frames, resembling a halo and acting as a medium to connect the interior with the exterior. The exterior encompasses a disjointed and hollow space while interior frames are quite smooth and polished, with narrow grooves directing one to discover the interior of the art piece.Some other pieces of art display a rougher and less orderly texture, made from natural raw material such as cotton, bio- adhesives, hay, wood and leaves; the originality in the raw material reflects natureʼs simplicity and mortality.The paintings are products of a continuous process of destruction, abrasion, battery and stuffing, resulting in their amalgamation with the physical surface beneath them in such a way that has them carved or torn in some areas.Just like physical pieces, drawings contain two main visual layers. One is the linear layer that contains the frames and the other is the encasing layer that forms the texture and wraps around the frames. The layer containing the texture is at times placed on top of the frames and at others vice versa.The structure of frames, per se, becomes so prominent at times that it bulges out of the painting in bold lines and ,occasionally ,the whole piece is covered by a thin layer of paint very much like a piece of cloth that covers a structure.
This collection was formed based on the artistʼs reaction to an absence of sensors bonding man and nature. Sensors that would be able to instantaneously monitor nature and transform information received into parametrical statistics to establish a basis for decision making.Surfaces made from flexible structures and light material such as wood, metal screens and linen are reminiscent of birdsʼ nests, cocoons of insects and/or spider webs, forming flexible homes within the existing environmental setting. Manʼs primitive homes made from tree barks and fillers such as clay and plaster inspired me as well in designing an environmentally flexible model against modern constructions that are more resistant and rigid in adapting to nature.A network of orderly pieces of wood bound together have been wrapped around the frames, resembling a halo and acting as a medium to connect the interior with the exterior. The exterior encompasses a disjointed and hollow space while interior frames are quite smooth and polished, with narrow grooves directing one to discover the interior of the art piece.Some other pieces of art display a rougher and less orderly texture, made from natural raw material such as cotton, bio- adhesives, hay, wood and leaves; the originality in the raw material reflects natureʼs simplicity and mortality.The paintings are products of a continuous process of destruction, abrasion, battery and stuffing, resulting in their amalgamation with the physical surface beneath them in such a way that has them carved or torn in some areas.Just like physical pieces, drawings contain two main visual layers. One is the linear layer that contains the frames and the other is the encasing layer that forms the texture and wraps around the frames. The layer containing the texture is at times placed on top of the frames and at others vice versa.The structure of frames, per se, becomes so prominent at times that it bulges out of the painting in bold lines and ,occasionally ,the whole piece is covered by a thin layer of paint very much like a piece of cloth that covers a structure.
growing out of the ground in search of life is reminiscent of birth, regeneration and wood, or the trees’ dead body, in order to remind us of destruction. That is why his structures have an ephemeral quality. Installing fragile lattices in the solid wooden volumes, makes the audience doubt their durability, or displacement and reconstruction. This “un-structure” is at the core of our industrialized life. The artist is trying to remind us of this annoying dichotomy and this problematic fear and hope. How our lives on the planet (that is increasingly seem to be safer and more comfortable with the advancement of technology) is endangered by the extraction and consumption of non-renewable resources of the Earth?Believing in the existence of invisible forces that, as a network of peripheral nerves, sustain and ensure the survival of a su- per-organism such as Earth, the artist puts the mechanisms of some of his works in relation to a network that looks like a nervous system. In another level, there is also the metaphor of “neuro-environment,” emphasizing the continuity of the inter- woven network of urban life as a constructed nervous system that controls and governs the citizens in a cold architectural environment that hold them back away from nature. Entangled in this complex network, the artist wisely endeavors to engage not only our sight, but also our sense of touch and smell by using the odor of natural elements such as wood.In his second solo show, Amin Shojai exhibits a coherent se- ries of works that is an inevitable sequel to his previous works. He still insists on his formal and conceptual concerns and seeks to create artworks that not only present his audience with the possibility of gaining aesthetic experience and enjoy- ing a visual encounter, but also to raise awareness of human responsibility vis-à-vis an environmental dilemma. Hamid-Reza KaramiAutumn of 2017